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Liver fat directly raises risk of type 2 diabetes

Research, funded Diabetes UK, has revealed that having higher levels of fat in the liver, and having a smaller pancreas, directly increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

The findings provide a significant step forward in understanding the biological causes driving the development of the condition. This research could unlock new treatment approaches and allow more tailored ways to help people reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes, as well as prevent cases altogether.

Researchers, led by Dr. Hanieh Yaghootkar, at Brunel University, explored whether liver and pancreas size and fat content could play a direct role in causing type 2 diabetes. They used Mendelian randomisation – a statistical method that uses genetic and health information to understand cause and effect. The team looked at data from 32,859 people who had had MRI scans as part of the UK Biobank study. Liver and pancreas fat and size were analysed from these scans, alongside information about genes that affect them. This was to understand their role in the risk of developing diabetes.

The researchers found that people with a genetic make-up that makes them prone to storing fat in their liver are more likely to have type 2 diabetes. This suggests that higher liver fat levels directly increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, with their analysis showing that for every 5% increase in liver fat, the risk of type 2 diabetes increases by 27%. Similarly, having a smaller pancreas was found to have a direct role in causing type 2 diabetes.

Pancreas fat levels and liver size were associated with type 2 diabetes but were not found to play a direct role in raising type 2 diabetes risk. The researchers also looked at data from 9,000 people with type 1 diabetes, but liver and pancreas size or fat levels were not found to be directly linked to the autoimmune condition.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) occurs when fat builds up in the liver. NAFLD is most commonly seen in people living with obesity or overweight, and having higher levels of liver fat has previously been associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. However, this is the strongest evidence to date to suggest liver fat and pancreas size have a hand in causing the condition.

Type 2 diabetes is a complex condition with many risk factors, some that can’t be changed such as age, ethnicity and family history, and some that can, such as body weight. Previous research has shown that losing weight can reduce liver fat levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Piecing together how different factors impact the risk of developing type 2 diabetes is important in understanding the most effective ways to help people reduce their risk.

In future, those with a certain genetic makeup that may make them prone to higher liver fat levels or a smaller pancreas could be offered tailored support to help them take steps to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes early on.

Dr. Hanieh Yaghootkar at Brunel University, said: “People with type 2 diabetes usually have excess fat in their liver and pancreas, the two key organs in the maintenance of the normal level of blood sugar. The genetic analysis we used in this study is the best possible method to test this relationship and we provided evidence for a causal role of liver fat in type 2 diabetes risk.

“Our results encourage better treatment of those living with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and provide evidence for the multiple benefits of weight loss and better screening for diabetes risk in these people.

“We also showed that people with genes that make them more likely to have a smaller pancreas have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. These results suggest that underlying mechanisms associated with reduced pancreatic volume precede diagnosis of type 2 diabetes.

“We hope by better characterisation of fat in different organs and also different organ size in the future, we can provide better understanding of the mechanisms that cause type 2 diabetes.”

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Upcoming Events

Arab Health 2022

Dubai World Trade Centre
24th - 27th January

Knowlex Infection Prevention & Control 2022

National Conference Centre, Birmingham
8th - 9th February

Central Sterilising Club 60th Anniversary Annual Scientific Meeting

Crowne Plaza, Bridge Foot, Stratford-upon-Avon, CV37 6YR
4th - 5th April

iM Med Decontamination Academy Spring Conference

Royal College of Physicians, London
11th May 2022

NPAG Theatres and Decontamination Conference

Coventry Building Society Arena
19th May 2022

EBME Expo 2022

Coventry Building Society Arena, Phoenix Way, Rowleys Green, Coventry CV6 6GE
28th - 29th June

Access the latest issue of Clinical Services Journal on your mobile device together with an archive of back issues.

Download the FREE Clinical Services Journal app from your device's App store

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