The website of the Clinical Services Journal

Breaking transmission via healthcare surfaces

Infection control precautions, including regular cleaning and decontamination, are vital to help reduce the burden of healthcare-associated infections. However, traditional disinfectants only offer limited residual activity.

Incorporating antimicrobial additives into different materials found in patient areas could offer continuous prevention of microbial growth and complement cleaning and disinfection strategies. Jonathan Clapp reports. 

Healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) pose a great threat to healthcare institutions across Europe, prolonging hospital stays, requiring further therapeutic interventions and, in worst case scenarios, increasing the incidence of death. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) reported that the six most common types of HCAIs – including urinary tract infections and pneumonia – result in 90,000 patient deaths every year in the EU, which is more than any single infectious disease under its surveillance, including HIV/ AIDS.1 The biggest concern is that more than half of these incidences are thought to be entirely avoidable with active prevention and control programmes, such as cleaning and aseptic practices.2 Routine infection control protocols and best practices are encouraged at all times to protect both staff and patients from the microorganisms that cause infection. But the COVID-19 pandemic gave every healthcare setting the impetus to re-evaluate its standard infection control precautions, with more onus placed on using the correct personal protective equipment (PPE), thorough handwashing and regular cleaning of surfaces; all with the aim of reducing infection transmission.

Is cleaning enough?

Log in or register FREE to read the rest

This story is Premium Content and is only available to registered users. Please log in at the top of the page to view the full text. If you don't already have an account, please register with us completely free of charge.
Register

Upcoming Events

AfPP Annual Conference 2022

University of York
8-11 September 2022

Infection 360: What's trending in infection prevention & control

Edgbaston Stadium, Birmingham
27-28 September 2022

IP2022 IS COMING TO BOURNEMOUTH IN OCTOBER 2022

Bournemouth
17-19 October 2022

UKHCA Conference: Listen Up

Pendulum Hotel and Manchester Conference Centre, Manchester
3rd November 2022

MEDICA 2022

Dusseldorf Germany
14th November - 17th November

Future Surgery 2022

ExCel, London
15th - 16th November 2022

Access the latest issue of Clinical Services Journal on your mobile device together with an archive of back issues.

Download the FREE Clinical Services Journal app from your device's App store

Upcoming Events

AfPP Annual Conference 2022

University of York
8-11 September 2022

Infection 360: What's trending in infection prevention & control

Edgbaston Stadium, Birmingham
27-28 September 2022

IP2022 IS COMING TO BOURNEMOUTH IN OCTOBER 2022

Bournemouth
17-19 October 2022

UKHCA Conference: Listen Up

Pendulum Hotel and Manchester Conference Centre, Manchester
3rd November 2022

MEDICA 2022

Dusseldorf Germany
14th November - 17th November

Future Surgery 2022

ExCel, London
15th - 16th November 2022

Access the latest issue of Clinical Services Journal on your mobile device together with an archive of back issues.

Download the FREE Clinical Services Journal app from your device's App store

Step Communications Ltd, Step House, North Farm Road, Tunbridge Wells, Kent TN2 3DR
Tel: 01892 779999 Fax: 01892 616177
www.step-communications.com
© 2022 Step Communications Ltd. Registered in England. Registration Number 3893025