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Early COVID-19 can be mistaken as vaccine side-effects

Early symptoms of COVID-19 can’t be clearly differentiated from vaccine side-effects, new findings show. Researchers recommend that if people show symptoms of COVID-19 after vaccination, they should stay at home and arrange to have a test.

The study, published recently in eClinical Medicine and led by King’s, analysed data from 362,770 UK users of the ZOE COVID Study App who had been vaccinated between 8 December 2020 and 17 May 2021 who subsequently reported at least one symptom associated with COVID-19 within the first week of vaccination. Of these, 14,842 people took a PCR or lateral flow test; and 150 people subsequently reported positive for COVID-19.

In order to identify the difference between early COVID-19 and post-vaccination side effects, the scientists used traditional machine learning models to review a comprehensive list of symptoms associated with COVID-19. They also analysed the data using just the three core symptoms of high temperature, new continuous cough, and loss/change to sense of smell.

The models were unable to tell the difference between symptoms in people with confirmed COVID-19 infection and symptoms due to vaccination alone in a clinically useful manner. Put plainly, there was no way to tell whether symptoms such as headache, fever, fatigue, or general aches and pains were due to vaccination or to early COVID-19 in the first week after the jab, unless a test was taken.

At the time the study was performed in Spring and Summer 2021, COVID-19 cases in the UK had declined to 2,000 cases a day, and as such the number of positive cases in the study itself was small. Currently, though, more than 40,000 new cases have been reported each day in the last week; and the likelihood of community transmission is much higher now than it was in the Spring of 2021.

Researchers warn that the current levels of circulating virus mean it is especially important to check whether post-vaccination symptoms are in fact due to COVID-19, noting that immunity to the virus does not occur immediately after vaccination. This is particularly crucial for adults and older children who have recently had their first jab.

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Upcoming Events

AfPP Annual Conference 2022

University of York
8-11 September 2022

Infection 360: What's trending in infection prevention & control

Edgbaston Stadium, Birmingham
27-28 September 2022

IP2022 IS COMING TO BOURNEMOUTH IN OCTOBER 2022

Bournemouth
17-19 October 2022

UKHCA Conference: Listen Up

Pendulum Hotel and Manchester Conference Centre, Manchester
3rd November 2022

MEDICA 2022

Dusseldorf Germany
14th November - 17th November

Future Surgery 2022

ExCel, London
15th - 16th November 2022

Access the latest issue of Clinical Services Journal on your mobile device together with an archive of back issues.

Download the FREE Clinical Services Journal app from your device's App store

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